Day 26 – #5 Simple Tips to Help With Reading from a Screen – Assistive Technology #28daysofwriting

#youwillseehowdifficultitistoreadthiswithoutspace

There is a US study which claims to show that increasing the gap between letters may make reading easier for struggling readers. VoiceDream will do this for you (Day 14) but for most students this is not possible.

Some easier steps may help however:

1. A larger font – this can be seen just from children’s books to adult books but if you are showing a lot of text on the whiteboard, it would be useful if the font were 14 or 16 rather than 12.

2. The right font – evenly spaced sans serif font such as Arial or Tahoma is recommended. There is a free font called Open Dyslexic which can be downloaded. It then just sits in the font choices along with all the others in Word. Some students, those who report moving letters particularly, seem to like this font as it is weighted. Others however hate it and prefer Arial. It is worth encouraging students to try different fonts to see if it makes a difference.

3. Changing the background colour – this is one of the easiest things a student can do. Many seem to choose electric blue or pink – no idea why. A few of my students choose a black background with white or orange text. Again, if they say it helps, why not? I like buff – it just reduces the glare of the white background and makes reading less stressful (before anyone rushes to the comments box to tell me there’s no research, I don’t care, it helps me and seems to help the occasional student). Some teachers will change the background colour on their whiteboard to an off white or light pastel colour which is a nice gesture.

4. Underlining – this can really confuse students who struggle to read – not only are they trying to decipher the letters and the word but there’s another bit of print underneath to contend with. ALSO WRITING IN CAPITALS IS DIFFICULT TO READ.

5. Preferable to underlining and italics is to use bold and bullet points. This emphasises text without changing the shape of the letters. Big blocks of text with no obvious break can be difficult to read and breaking it down into smaller sections or text boxes (even with different colours) can help students. 1.5 line spacing helps.

If you want to research this further, work is being done by E.A. Draffan at Southampton University and JISCtechdis offer good advice.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s